Episode #1074 Mark Britnell: In Search of the Perfect Health System

Hero 56975e2c3dcde2ca632efa35f5826dc5 medium

Moe and Dr. Mark Britnell talk about what a truly great health system could look like.


W1siziisijiwmtuvmtevmtgvmtivmdevmtyvnti2l1bst0yucg5nil0swyjwiiwidgh1bwiilcixmdb4mtawiyjdxq

Mark Britnell

Chairman and Partner of the Global Health Practice at KPMG View Full Profile

Is There a Perfect Healthcare System?

There’s no shortage of problems facing our current healthcare system; and as the 2016 open-enrollment season gets under way, the most disturbing issues continue to be the escalating rate increases, the quality of care and the overall complexity of the ecosystem.  As someone who has opted for high-deductible plans over the course of the past decade, it’s unsettling to see a 21% premium hike on top of the out-of-pocket expenditure that such a plan requires.  There doesn’t appear to be a light at the end of the tunnel, but if those in positions of power listen closely to Dr. Mark Britnell, Chairman and Partner of KPMG’s Global Health Practice, they just might see a better path forward.

In his book, In Search of The Perfect Health System, Dr. Britnell admits that such a system doesn’t exist; but if it did, “it would include the research and development component of the Unites States, the primary care of Israel, and the values and universal care of the United Kingdom.  It would also feature the community services of Brazil, the innovation of India, the mental health system of Australia, and the aged care of Japan.”  These are among the twelve best practices that he’s identified, and its what anchors our conversation.  

Here’s how we break them down:

  • The twelve discipline framework

  • The role of technology and shifting responsibilities

  • The shift from illness to well being and what it means for the patients

  • Why mental health impacts each of us - directly or indirectly

  • The problems and opportunities of longevity

  • What we can learn from Switzerland

  • Universal healthcare — good or bad?

  • Resources: